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South Carolina state attorney caught with stripper in graveyard

A deputy assistant attorney general who said he was on his lunch break when an officer found him with a stripper and sex toys in his sport utility vehicle has been fired, his boss said Wednesday.

Roland Corning, 66, a former state legislator, was in a secluded part of a downtown cemetery when an officer spotted him Monday, according to a police report obtained by The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act.

As the officer approached, Corning sped off, then pulled over a few blocks away. He and the 18-year-old woman with him, an employee of the Platinum Plus Gentleman’s Club, gave conflicting stories about what they were doing in the cemetery, Officer Michael Wines wrote in his report, though he did not elaborate.

Corning gave Wines a badge showing he worked for the state Attorney General’s Office. Wines, whose wife also works there, called her to make sure Corning was telling the truth.

He then searched the SUV, where he found a Viagra pill and several sex toys, items Corning said he always kept with him, “just in case,” according to the report.

Corning and the woman were let go without charges. Wines’ wife reported the call to her supervisor, who told Attorney General Henry McMaster.

“We received credible information about inappropriate behavior Monday afternoon,” McMaster said Wednesday. “And by the close of business, he was no longer working here.”

Such a trip to the cemetery “would not be appropriate, at any time, for an assistant attorney general,” McMaster said.

There was no answer Wednesday at a number listed for Corning, who was a Republican legislator in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He was hired in 2000 by the attorney general’s office, where he worked on securities cases.

South Carolina has had its share of scandal lately, most notably Gov. Mark Sanford’s disappearance in June. His office told reporters he was hiking the Appalachian Trail, but he was really in Argentina visiting his mistress.

Police: SC state attorney caught with stripper

Ex-SC lawmaker fired from AG’s office after police say they caught him with stripper in SUV

MEG KINNARD
AP News

Oct 28, 2009 12:52 EST

A deputy assistant attorney general who said he was on his lunch break when an officer found him with a stripper and sex toys in his sport utility vehicle has been fired, his boss said Wednesday.

Roland Corning, 66, a former state legislator, was in a secluded part of a downtown cemetery when an officer spotted him Monday, according to a police report obtained by The Associated Press under the Freedom of Information Act.

As the officer approached, Corning sped off, then pulled over a few blocks away. He and the 18-year-old woman with him, an employee of the Platinum Plus Gentleman’s Club, gave conflicting stories about what they were doing in the cemetery, Officer Michael Wines wrote in his report, though he did not elaborate.

Corning gave Wines a badge showing he worked for the state Attorney General’s Office. Wines, whose wife also works there, called her to make sure Corning was telling the truth.

He then searched the SUV, where he found a Viagra pill and several sex toys, items Corning said he always kept with him, “just in case,” according to the report.

Corning and the woman were let go without charges. Wines’ wife reported the call to her supervisor, who told Attorney General Henry McMaster.

“We received credible information about inappropriate behavior Monday afternoon,” McMaster said Wednesday. “And by the close of business, he was no longer working here.”

Such a trip to the cemetery “would not be appropriate, at any time, for an assistant attorney general,” McMaster said.

There was no answer Wednesday at a number listed for Corning, who was a Republican legislator in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He was hired in 2000 by the attorney general’s office, where he worked on securities cases.

South Carolina has had its share of scandal lately, most notably Gov. Mark Sanford’s disappearance in June. His office told reporters he was hiking the Appalachian Trail, but he was really in Argentina visiting his mistress.

Source: AP News

Posted by Cordi on October 29th, 2009 No Comments

Pentagon officials won’t confirm Bush propaganda program ended

[Read Part I and Part II of this series.]

The covert Bush administration program that used retired military analysts to generate favorable wartime news coverage may not have been terminated, Raw Story has found.

In interviews, Pentagon officials in charge of the press and community relations offices — which worked in partnership on the military analyst program — equivocated on the subject of whether the program has ended.

Last May, the Pentagon’s Office of Inspector General issued a memorandum rescinding a Bush administration investigative report on the retired military analyst program because it “did not meet accepted quality standards for an Inspector General work product.” The now-retracted report had exonerated officials of using propaganda and referred to the program as just “one of many outreach groups.”

Yet Donald Horstman, Pentagon Inspector General deputy director, also stated in the memorandum that his office wouldn’t probe further because the “outreach program has been terminated and responsible senior officials are no longer employed by the Department.”

Raw Story’s investigation, however, has shown that some “responsible senior officials” are still employed by the Defense Department, including Bryan Whitman, who remains a chief Pentagon spokesman and head of all media operations, and Roxie Merritt, who is head of the Pentagon’s community relations office.

Raw Story has discovered that Horstman’s other justification for not reopening an investigation at the time – “because the [retired military analyst] outreach program has been terminated” – remains an open question.

A week after David Barstow’s New York Times expose on the program broke in April 2008, Whitman said the military analyst program’s suspension was only “temporary.”

Reiterating at the time that he thought the program was merely a way to better inform the American public, he also said, “It’s temporarily suspended just so that we can take a look at some of the concerns.”

When Raw Story asked Mr. Whitman if this program was still being run out of the Pentagon, he first replied firmly, “No, not at this point.”

But then, in what seemed an attempt to downplay his role in the program, he quickly added, “Again, it’s not one of my programs and it would be up to the leadership of public affairs, a new assistant secretary of defense, making any sort of determination to go forward if they deemed it appropriate, necessary, whatever.”

“It’s hard for me to tell what future leadership might decide to do,” Whitman continued. “Again, since it’s not part of the media operations aspect of public affairs here, it’s not a program for which I will be making a decision about.”

Raw Story also asked Roxie Merritt if she could confirm that the military analyst program has been officially terminated.

Ms. Merritt, in an email interview, first replied, “[A]t the present time, we don’t have regularly scheduled conference calls with retired military analysts” but that “we would not, however, preclude responding to queries for information from or provide future opportunities for them to talk to defense leaders and program managers.”

Merritt also noted that should there be regularly scheduled conference calls with the military analysts again in the future, they would be shared in various publicly accessible formats.

She added, though, “Obviously, there are operational security and privacy act issues and other government regulations that must be handled carefully, but we make every possible effort to be open and transparent.”

Asked then to confirm if, in the interim, her office has been open to providing information on an individual basis to retired military analysts, Merritt replied, “Sure. If asked, we would provide them with the same information that we would provide you if you had a question about DoD.”

During the interviews, neither Whitman nor Merritt expressed concern about the way the military analyst program was run by the Bush administration.

Iraq then and Afghanistan now

Internal Pentagon documents show that the military analyst program was stepped up in 2005, when US public support for the war in Iraq began to sour. Today, as recent polls show American support for the war in Afghanistan plummeting, the Pentagon and the Obama White House are facing a similar problem.

If the military analyst program, in some form or another, is still being run from the Pentagon, then the two most senior players in the Bush administration propaganda project remaining at the Defense Department, Bryan Whitman and Roxie Merritt, would be poised to step up activities once again.

And they are not currently under the watchful eye of any direct superiors who’ve been brought in by the Obama administration.

While Whitman said that the future of the program would be up to the next assistant secretary of defense, he also confirmed that that position, which is filled by political appointment, remains vacant.

No one, he added, has even been nominated yet.

Merritt is in a similar position of enhanced authority because the position above her has yet to be filled. Currently serving as President Obama’s director of the Pentagon office for community relations, she’s also its de facto chief until a new deputy assistant secretary of defense for internal communications is appointed.

What’s more, Merritt — whose email signature line was “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of All Who Threaten It” (p. 30) — formerly worked as Whitman’s press office director at the time of the military analyst program’s increased activity in 2005.

Whitman and Merritt’s career civil servant status also continue to buffer them from scrutiny regarding political or ideological motivations, regardless of their activities in the Bush administration.

Retired Air Force Colonel Sam Gardiner, an expert in military strategy and operations who has taught at the National War College, Air War College and Naval War College and has been critical of Bush administration strategy, expressed disgust at the Bush holdovers who took part in propaganda against the American public, regardless of whether they were political or career appointees.

Commenting on Whitman’s presence in the Obama administration, Gardiner said, “He should be so tainted with what the Bush administration did that that in itself would be enough that he should be gone, even if he’s a career appointee.”

“The list of things that Pentagon public affairs participated in during the run-up [to the Iraq war] and immediately after the invasion are horrendous,” Gardiner continued.

But he pointed out that Whitman “serves as a career person as long as his performance is satisfactory to his immediate superiors.”

As to suggestions that Whitman be held accountable by a congressional investigative body for his part in the military analyst program, Gardiner noted, “Congress doesn’t evaluate individual performance of people. It evaluates the performance of organizations.”

Journalist and historian Norman Solomon said he found an “unfortunate logic” to Whitman remaining at the Pentagon.

Solomon, who recently visited Afghanistan on a fact-finding mission, told Raw Story, “A White House that sees fit to continue on with Robert Gates might see no problem with continuing on with Bryan Whitman.”

He added, “The empirical answer [to why he remains] would be that he’s still useful.”

Veteran foreign correspondent Reese Erlich, who is currently independently covering the Afghanistan war, believes that “to some extent, the Obama administration is just simply replicating all the same mistakes of the Bush administration – particularly the war in Afghanistan.”

“And if you’re going to do that,” he explained in an interview with Raw Story, “then you need propagandists who can make stuff up to make the war seem more popular in the short run.”

Posted by Cordi on October 29th, 2009 No Comments

Cordi’s Feed & Seed – How to give the Perfect Massage

It sounds like a no-brainer, but massages are especially effective for aches like low-back pain. Researchers have found that massage works better than common treatments including chiropractic therapy and acupuncture.

It’s not clear why, but several studies show massage reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol, while boosting the feel-good hormones serotonin and dopamine.

Those changes slow your heart rate, reduce blood pressure, and block your nervous system’s pain receptors. Massage also increases blood flow to the muscles, which may help them heal.

Massage also seems to ease distress from migraine, labor pain, and even cancer, as well as the body tenderness seen with fibromyalgia.

Plus, the benefits may last as long as a year after just a few treatments.

Hello, dreams

Fluctuations in several types of brain waves either relax you or wake you up. Massage increases delta waves — those linked with deep sleep. That’s why it’s easy to drift off on the massage table.

Brain Power

A 15-minute massage boosts mental alertness. Tests show that brain-wave activity stimulated by massage is linked to improved attention.

Immune Booster

Massage helps ward off bugs by boosting your “natural killer cells,” the immune system’s first line of defense against invading illness. Cortisol destroys natural killer cells therefore, since massage decreases cortisol, your immune cells get a boost. Massage even seems to boost immunity in those people with severely compromised immune systems, such as breast-cancer patients.

Blues, be gone

Less cortisol and more serotonin and dopamine in your system may also mean less stress, anxiety, and depression. The right side of the frontal lobe of the brain is more active when we’re sad, and the left side is activated when we’re happy.

Studies have observed that massage decreases activity in the right lobe and increases functioning in the left. The well-being people feel after a massage is a big reason why some hospitals offer it to anxious patients pre­paring for surgery and cancer patients going through chemo.

PMS

A study involving women with severe PMS found that massage reduced symp­toms such as pain, water retention, and mood swings.

Cordi’s Tips on how to give the Perfect Massage

Set the Mood

The first step to a truly relaxing and sensual massage is setting the mood. Unplug the phone, turn off the tv and the computer. Light some candles, burn some incense and play some relaxing, sensual music. My personal favorite is “Air on the G String” by Bach.

Make sure the room is warm and your partner is completely naked. You want your lover to chill out, not freeze.

Accessories

Set up a massage workspace by covering your mattress with towels — so the massage oil doesn’t ruin your sheets.

Massage oil is the only required accessory. You can use scented or unscented, or even baby oil in a pinch. Rub your hands together to warm them and the oil up before touching your partner’s bare skin.

To easily make your own massage oil, just add between 10-20 drops of your favorite essential oil to about a cup of olive oil.

TIP: If you plan to get busy with a condom later, buy a water-based massage liquid — oil can destroy latex.

The Basics

The most sensitive body parts are: head and neck, ears, sides of the body from armpits to hips, inner thighs, fingers and toes, and, of course, genitals. Keep this handy list in mind as you provide some sensual R&R.

Here’s the rub

Practice these basic massage strokes on your partner and ask for feedback on which he enjoys most.

  • Slide: Lightly slide your hands up and down your partner’s body using your entire hand surface. This stroke is great for the arms, legs, back, and chest.
  • Palm circling: Move your hands in circles on your partner’s fleshy parts. Be careful not to massage bones directly — it doesn’t feel very good.
  • Knead: Grasp your honey’s flesh as if you were kneading bread dough. Use on the stomach, legs, tush, arms, hands, and feet.
  • Roll: Roll the flesh of your sweetie’s arms and legs between your hands as if you were rolling clay.
  • Tapping or hacking: Using your fingertips or the sides of your hands, make tapping or hacking motions. This is great for the back.
  • Thumb strokes: Using your thumbs, massage in a circular motion. Work upward and away from the spine when focusing on the back and shoulders.
  • Fingertip and fingernail circling: Use your fingertips or nails to draw circular shapes all over your partner’s skin.
  • Hair sweep: If you have long hair, sweep it across your partner’s body.
  • Sweep down: when doing any move in a massage, it is important to remember to always start and finish with a sweep down. Apply light pressure to the area and move your hands down away from the body part being massaged. This is ancient technique and believed to push the bad energy out of the body and into the ground, instead of spreading it through the body.

Now give the perfect massage

1. Laying on of hands. With your guy lying on his stomach, buck-naked, warm your hands by rubbing them together and place them on your partner — one hand on the upper back, one hand on the lower. Leave your hands there for a long moment; this starts your lover on the path to relaxation.

2. Spread the oil. Make sure you’ve warmed it in your hands first, and start with a very small amount.

3. Start rubbing. Rub your hands up and down your sweetie’s whole backside. Accentuate the different strokes described above that your lover enjoys the most, until you feel relaxation set in. The back and the tush are excellent places to use the tapping/hacking technique. These are both excellent for breaking up stress.

4. Legs. Continue onto the legs. Be sure to cover both front and back sides with sensual strokes. I recommend using a kneading motion on the inner thighs, the thumb motion on the back of the knees and then knead again on the calves.

5. Arms and hands. Pay special attention to the hands. Use your thumbs to massage the heels of your lover’s hands. Lock your fingers with his and rotate his wrists gently.

6. Feet. There’s a whole school of massage — reflexology — devoted solely to the feet. Taking care of the feet is very important and one of the area’s that I always try to focus special attention on. Be sure to massage each toe and the area between them. Massage the top, sides, backs and the bottom of the feet. Our feet carry the weight of our bodies, so treat them right. It isn’t uncommon for me to spend 15 minutes on each foot.

7. Front torso. Take care massaging the abdomen. Press deeply, but not so much that it hurts. Ask if what you’re doing feels good. The abdomen and the chest are the perfect places to use the hair sweep if you have long hair.

8. Chest. Knead the fleshy parts, and use your fingertips to massage the nipples. Imagine that your fingers are following the spokes on a bicycle wheel, and let them radiate from the center of the nipple to its edge. Remember to use a light touch!

9. Neck and head. Anyone who’s gotten a scalp massage knows how it makes you tingle all over. Use your fingertips and nails to really dig in there…gently! Use fingers to run through the hair, with fingertips lightly gliding across the scalp.

10. Ears and Temples. Using thumb strokes, apply gentle pressure behind the ears and then gently massage the ear lobes with your thumb and forefinger. Run your fingers slowly up the side of the head in a circular motion to reach the temples and lightly massage with your thumbs in clockwise motion.

10. Genitals. If you’re going erotic, go all the way. Chances are you’ll get a thankful response no matter what you do.

Posted by Cordi on October 29th, 2009 No Comments

Cordi’s Feed and Seed – Allergies

What is an allergy?
Allergy is a catch-all word for a wide variety of reactions to substances that the body determines to be foreign. Anything that it does not recognize as itself can be considered an allergen. When the body encounters a foreign substance, it reacts by making antibodies or releasing certain chemicals called histamines. When histamines and other substances are released into the system, they cause an inflammatory reaction we call an allergy.

Allergies are greatly misunderstood and inadequately treated by conventional medicine. An allergy is the result of your immune system’s over-reaction to pollens, grass, airborne fungi and even certain foods and cosmetics. With more than 60,000 chemicals already existing in our environment, and nearly 500 new ones being created annually, we also face biochemical challenges to our immune system. When an allergen is introduced, the body fights back by producing an excess of inflammatory chemicals, such as histamine, from mast cells. This attempt to seek-and-destroy the allergen brings on the familiar symptoms of runny nose, watery eyes, sore throat and sneezing.

Given their generic name, antihistamines must prevent the production of histamine, right? No, they do not. Antihistamines merely block the action of histamine at receptor sites. In other words, they suppress the appearance of physical symptoms but do nothing to redirect the underlying cause.  Antihistamines also often produce undesirable side effects, such as dizziness, drowsiness and even depression.

One of the mechanisms involved in an allergic response is the release of leukotrienes, an agent which can restrict bronchial tubes up to 1,000 times greater than can histamine. The production of leukotrienes is made possible by the presence of arachidonic acid, a fatty acid found exclusively in animal products. Therefore, during serious bouts with allergies, you may want to consume an all vegan diet, or at least consider reducing your consumption of meat and dairy products, until your body has conquered its battle with the allergy.

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The inflammatory reaction affects the tissue and organs, mainly the skin, mucous membranes, lungs and gastrointestinal tract.

Symptoms commonly produced include: itching and watery eyes, runny and congested nose and sinuses, sneezing, respiratory symptoms, headache, skin reactions and rapid heart beat. Other symptoms may include fatigue, intestinal gas or pain, abdominal bloating and mood changes.

Will Acupressure Relieve Sinus Symptoms?

Above the nose and between the eyes at the brow, on either side of the nose at the corners of the eyes, and to the side of each nostril there are acupressure points that affect the sinuses.

There are also sinus acupressure point on the back of the hand in the “web” and similar points in the hollow between the front and back muscles of the neck (roughly behind the bony area behind each ear).

Many allergy sufferers report that steady pressure with the index fingers on these points, starting at the nostrils, moving to the corners of the eyes, then to the hand, the back of the neck, and <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} p {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-margin-top-alt:auto; margin-right:0in; mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} p.western, li.western, div.western {mso-style-name:western; mso-style-unhide:no; mso-margin-top-alt:auto; margin-right:0in; mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –> ending with the area between the eyes, yields significant relief. About 30 seconds of pressure at each point, sometimes with a small circular motion, will suffice. This method can be repeated as often as needed.

If you are familiar with palm reading the best way to find your acupressure spot is to locate lower mars (which also coincides with the line on your palm that represents the head) and flip your hand over. The front side of these points is perfect for acupressure involving sinus relief. This area is also called “Joining of the Valleys”

Horseradish Root – acts as an antibiotic, antiseptic and works as a nasal and bronchial dialator and local irritant. Helps cleanse the sinuses. Makes it easier for you to breathe!

Nettle – a nutritive, alternative tonic. Antihistamine and anti-inflammatory; moderates allergic response and reactions. Astringent to mucous membranes. Use for chronic inflammations and excessive mucous discharge. Used to treat hay fever in particular, stinging nettle relieves itchy eyes and sneezing.

Stinging nettles are great herbs for allergies because they have natural antihistamine properties. They lower the body’s ability to produce histamine, which causes symptoms like runny or stuffy noses, watery eyes, and irritated airways. The next time you shop for antihistamines, get nettles instead. They are available in capsules at most health food stores.

You can take herb capsules, use stinging nettle cream, or add the tincture to beverages. Stinging nettle is commonly added to green tea for allergy relief.

Yarrow Flower – astringent and hemostatic; vascular tonic. Diaphoretic and antifever.

Try the Aloe Vera (Aloeride) plant. Analgesics are found in the yellow sap of Aloe Vera. This natural herb helps reduce swelling, pain, and irritation. Ingredients like camestrol, B-sitosterol, and lupeol especially offer allergy relief. Aloe Vera can be used to treat allergy rashes when applied topically.

Reishi Mushroom

Fungi are considered natural herbs, even though they are technically fungi and not plants. But why quibble? Reishi mushrooms are classified as natural herbs for allergies. Reishi mushrooms can be found through herbalists, health food stores and stores catering to Chinese traditional medicine. They’re quite tasty, like shiitake mushrooms, but to get the most benefit from them, you have to take capsules instead of eating a whole bowlful of Reishi Mushrooms. The mushroom acts as a natural antihistamine. It is also used to lower cholesterol and thin the blood.

Chamomile- This herb can offer natural allergy relief by preventing asthma attacks. It can reduce inflammation of the lungs, thereby relieving chest tightness and making breathing much easier. Other herbs that you can drink as tea to counter an attack are peppermint, ginger, anise, motherwort, passionflower, and lemon verbena.


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Plantain—It has long been used as an herb against respiratory troubles. It gives natural allergy relief for people with allergic symptoms such as coughing and wheezing.

Eyebright – acts as an anti-inflammatory and antihistamine to mucous membranes of the eyes, ears, nose, sinuses, throat and bronchi. Use for Coughs, hoarseness, headache, conjunctivitis (pink eye), earache and sinusitis.

Angelica comes to the rescue for hay fever as well as other allergic reactions. It contains compounds that block the body’s production of certain antibodies that are made as the result of an allergic response. Use about 1/2 teaspoon per cup of water for tea.

  • HONEY—1 – 2 teaspoon of local honey taken every day will greatly help to build up your immune system and therefore help to reduce the allergic reactions that you suffer from the various triggers. If you are already suffering from an allergy attack, take 1-2 TB every day until the symptoms lessen and then begin taking the 1-2 TSP daily.
  • The honey must be local honey not the fake store bought kind. You can usually find it at your herbal or natural stores. Check out my show notes from a few weeks ago when I discussed the amazing healing properties of honey and some of its uses.

  • Make an eyewash from goldenseal or eyebright teas. Once the tea has cooled, put in a dropper bottle and apply to irritated eyes.

  • Take parsley and bee pollen.

  • Take the herbs comfrey and juniper in capsule form.

  • Take pantothenic acid, vitamin C, and dolomite supplements.

Steam. Breathing steam refreshes and soothes irritated sinuses, and it helps rid the nasal passages of mucus. While it takes some time, it will make you feel wonderful! Boil several cups of water and pour into a big bowl (or a plugged sink). Lean carefully over the bowl, and drape a towel over your head. Breathe gently for 5 to 10 minutes. If you have any fresh or dried peppermint add that to the boiling water. If you have any peppermint oil..add 3-5 drops into the water and then inhale the steam.

When you’re finished breathing steam, use the water for a second purpose: Let the water cool until warm, saturate a washcloth, and hold the cloth on your sinuses (to the sides of your nose, below the eyes, and above the eyebrows).

Basil. To help ease allergy symptoms such as hives, try dousing the skin with basil tea, a traditional Chinese folk remedy. Basil contains high amounts of an anti-allergic compound called caffeic acid. Place 1 ounce dried basil leaves into 1 quart boiling water. Cover, and let cool to room temperature. Use the tea as a rinse as often as needed.

Home Remedies From the Cupboard

Baking soda. One-half cup baking soda poured into a warm bath is an old New England folk remedy for soothing hives (red, itchy, raised areas on the skin). Soak in the bath for 20 to 30 minutes.

Tea. Allergy sufferers throughout the centuries have turned to hot tea to provide relief for clogged-up noses and irritated mucous membranes, and one of the best for symptom relief is peppermint tea. Peppermint’s benefits extend well beyond its delicious smell; the essential oil acts <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} span.articlebody {mso-style-name:articlebody; mso-style-unhide:no;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:2058552837; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:602017542 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:.5in; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} –>
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as a decongestant, and substances in peppermint contain anti-inflammatory and mild antibacterial constituents.

To make peppermint tea: Place 1/2 ounce dried peppermint leaves in a 1-quart jar. Fill two-thirds of the jar with boiling water, and steep for five minutes. (You can inhale the steam for added benefit). Let cool, strain, sweeten if desired, and drink. (Note: Peppermint tea should be used with caution in children, as the menthol in peppermint may cause them to choke.)

Home Remedies From the Freezer

Ice. Wrap a washcloth around ice cubes and apply it to your sinuses for instant relief and refreshment.

Home Remedies From the Refrigerator

Milk. Milk does the body good, especially when it comes to hives. Wet a cloth with cold milk and lay it on the affected area for 10 to 15 minutes.

Wasabi. If you’re a hay fever sufferer who also loves Japanese food, this remedy will please. Wasabi, that pale-green, fiery condiment served with many Japanese dishes, is a member of the horseradish family. Anyone who has taken too big a dollop of wasabi (or plain old horseradish) knows that it makes sinuses and tear ducts spring into action. That’s because allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent in wasabi, promotes mucus flow.

The tastiest way to get those allyl isothiocyanates is by slathering horseradish on your sandwich or plopping wasabi onto your favorite sushi. Another option — although harder to swallow — is to purchase grated horseradish, and take 1/4 teaspoon to alleviate allergy symptoms.

  • Avoid the culprit. Sometimes, the best way to reduce the discomfort of an allergy is to avoid exposure to the allergen as much as possible. If you are allergic to cats, for example, avoid visiting the homes of friends who own them. If you must be around a cat, make the visit as short as possible, avoid touching or picking up the animal, and wash your hands when you leave.
  • Rinse your eyes. If your eyes are itchy and irritated and you have no access to allergy medicine, rinsing your eyes with cool, clean water may help soothe them. Although not as effective as an antihistamine, this remedy certainly can’t do any harm.Try a warm washcloth. If sinus passages feel congested and painful, a washcloth soaked in warm water may make things flow a little easier. Place the washcloth over the nose and upper-cheek area and relax for a few minutes.

Use saline solution. Irrigating the nose with saline solution (salt water) may help soothe upper respiratory allergies by removing irritants that become lodged in the nose and cause inflammation. In fact, saline solution may even wash away some of the inflammatory cells themselves. You can buy ready-made saline solution at your local drugstore, or you can make your own fresh solution daily by mixing a teaspoon of salt in a pint of warm, distilled water and adding a pinch of baking soda. Bend over a sink and sniff a bit of solution into one nostril at a time, allowing it to drain back out through the nose or mouth; do this once or twice a day. (If you also have asthma, however, check with your doctor before trying this remedy.)

Wash your hair. If you’ve spent long hours outdoors during the pollen season, wash your hair to remove pollen after you come inside. The sticky yellow stuff tends to collect on the hair, making it more likely to fall into your eyes.

Take a shower. If you wake up in the middle of the night with a coughing, sneezing allergy attack, a hot shower may wash off any pollen residues you’ve collected on your <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} span.articlebody {mso-style-name:articlebody; mso-style-unhide:no;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:2058552837; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:602017542 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:.5in; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} –>
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  • body throughout the day. (You might want to change your pillowcase, too.) It may also help open up your sinuses, at least for a while, making breathing a little easier. The warm water may even help you relax and go back to sleep.Wear glasses. On a windy day in pollen season, a pair of sunglasses (or your regular prescription eyeglasses, if you wear them) may help shield your eyes from airborne allergens. For extra protection, try a pair of sunglasses with side shields or even a pair of goggles.

    Beware of the air. Breathing polluted air can worsen symptoms. In fact, airborne toxins can actually cause allergies in some people. If you suspect that air pollution triggers your attacks, spend as little time outdoors as possible on smoggy days. When you must go outside, wear a surgical mask, especially while exercising. Don’t expect miracles (the mask won’t screen out all allergens) but it may help you breathe a little easier.

    Make your house or apartment a no-smoking zone. Tobacco smoke is a notorious irritant, either causing or aggravating respiratory allergies. Don’t let your friends and family foul the air with cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. And, of course, if you still light up, stop it!

    Keep the windows shut.
    A fresh breeze blowing through an open window on a spring day may sound inviting, but its bad news for an allergy sufferer, since it can fill the house with pollen. To minimize contact with the powdery stuff, keep windows closed at all times. Air purifiers, especially those with HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters) filters, may help eliminate indoor pollen, but they also tend to stir up dust, which might worsen some allergies.

Go bare. Carpets are notorious for being a haven for dust mites (microscopic bugs that feed on the dead skin cells we constantly shed and whose droppings spur allergies in millions of people). Bare floors, vacuumed and damp-mopped frequently, will help keep your home’s dust-mite population down (you can’t get rid of them all). If you can’t remove all the carpeting in your home, at least opt for bare floors (if necessary, use small, frequently laundered throw rugs) in your bedroom; studies show the bedroom harbors more dust mites than any other room in the home, and you probably spend about a third of your time there every day.

Filter your vacuum.
When carpets can’t be removed, keeping them as clean as possible will help you breathe a bit easier. But beware: Many vacuums blast small particles of dust back into the air, leaving behind plenty of allergens to keep you sneezing and wheezing. Use a vacuum that has a built-in HEPA filter or attach a filter to the exhaust port of your canister vac (uprights usually don’t have an exhaust port). If dust really bothers you and you’ve got the money, consider investing in an industrial-strength vacuuming system. Some allergists recommend a brand called Nilfisk, which has an excellent filtering system and retails for about $500. To find out whether such products are appropriate for you and where you can purchase filters or special vacuums, talk to your allergist.

Dehumidify. Dust mites love a humid environment, which allows them to reproduce like crazy. Invest in a dehumidifier or use an air conditioner, which works equally well. A dehumidifier can also help prevent mold, another allergen, from growing (just be sure to follow the manufacturer’s maintenance instructions). When cooking or showering, take advantage of the exhaust fan, another way to help keep humidity to a minimum.

Think before you burn. Although in some areas it is common to burn household and construction refuse, this may not be such a wise idea. The smoke from burning wood that has been treated with heavy metals or other chemical-laden materials can make anyone gag, but people with allergies or asthma have ultrasensitive respiratory systems, making <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} h3 {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-link:”Heading 3 Char”; mso-style-next:Normal; margin-top:12.0pt; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:3.0pt; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; page-break-after:avoid; mso-outline-level:3; font-size:13.0pt; font-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”; font-weight:bold;} p {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-margin-top-alt:auto; margin-right:0in; mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} span.Heading3Char {mso-style-name:”Heading 3 Char”; mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-locked:yes; mso-style-link:”Heading 3″; mso-ansi-font-size:13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:13.0pt; font-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”; mso-ascii-font-family:Arial; mso-hansi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; font-weight:bold;} span.articlebody {mso-style-name:articlebody; mso-style-unhide:no;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:2058552837; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:602017542 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:.5in; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} –>
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  • them even more vulnerable. Also, think twice about any material you burn in the fireplace. Of course, your best bet is to stay away from the fireplace altogether when it’s in use.

    Cut through the smoke.
    Many people with respiratory allergies find that wood smoke poses a particular problem. With wood stoves, the biggest problem is “choking down” the stove, or decreasing the amount of oxygen in order to cool down the fire. Choking down throws irritating toxins into the air, which you and your neighbors will breathe in.

  • Leave the mowing to someone else. During pollen season, a grass-allergic person is better off letting someone else, anyone else, mow the lawn. Call your local county extension service and find out when the pollination season occurs in your area, then arrange for a lawn-care company, friend, or relative to cut your grass during that time. (As a rule of thumb, in many parts of the country, people who are allergic to grass should avoid mowing between May and the Fourth of July.)Wash your pet.

    A little-known trick for dog or cat owners who are allergic to fur: Bathe your pet frequently. Fido and Fifi produce allergy-causing substances in their sweat and saliva that gets on their fur. Fortunately, these allergens dissolve in water, so a warm bath can rinse away the problem. If you’re a cat owner and can’t imagine bathing your beloved feline for fear of being scratched near to death, take heart: Some cats (though a minority, to be sure) purr when bathed. If you start bathing your feline regularly when it’s a kitten, chances are higher that clean-up time will be a harmonious experience. Wash your cat in warm water, with no soap, once every other week.

    In addition to bathing your pet, try to wash your hands soon after you’ve had direct contact with your furry friend.

    Make sure your final rinse really rinses.

    Chemicals in detergents and other laundry products can cause skin irritation in many people. That holds true even for detergents advertised as “mild.” Be sure that your washer removes all of the detergent from your clothes after the final rinse cycle. Try adding yet another rinse cycle to see if skin irritation decreases.

    Call ahead.
    When planning a vacation or business trip, call ahead to find a room that will be easier on your allergies. Ask for a room that’s not on the lower level, since it may have been flooded in the past and remain a haven for mold growth. Shop around for a hotel or motel that doesn’t allow pets, so you won’t be subject to the leftover dander of the last traveler’s dog or cat. If possible, bring your own vinyl- or plastic-encased pillow.

· Avoid food like tea/coffee or containing chemical additives and preservatives

Foods which should be excluded from the diet are tea, coffee, chocolate, cola drinks, alcohol, sugar and products made from it, refined cereals, meal, fish, chicken, tobacco, milk, cheese, butter, smoked and salted pickled foods, and foods containing any chemical additives, preservatives and flavorings.

Posted by Cordi on July 23rd, 2009 No Comments