Archive for the ‘Cordi’s Feed and Seed’ Category

 

Cordi’s Feed & Seed – How to give the Perfect Massage

It sounds like a no-brainer, but massages are especially effective for aches like low-back pain. Researchers have found that massage works better than common treatments including chiropractic therapy and acupuncture.

It’s not clear why, but several studies show massage reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol, while boosting the feel-good hormones serotonin and dopamine.

Those changes slow your heart rate, reduce blood pressure, and block your nervous system’s pain receptors. Massage also increases blood flow to the muscles, which may help them heal.

Massage also seems to ease distress from migraine, labor pain, and even cancer, as well as the body tenderness seen with fibromyalgia.

Plus, the benefits may last as long as a year after just a few treatments.

Hello, dreams

Fluctuations in several types of brain waves either relax you or wake you up. Massage increases delta waves — those linked with deep sleep. That’s why it’s easy to drift off on the massage table.

Brain Power

A 15-minute massage boosts mental alertness. Tests show that brain-wave activity stimulated by massage is linked to improved attention.

Immune Booster

Massage helps ward off bugs by boosting your “natural killer cells,” the immune system’s first line of defense against invading illness. Cortisol destroys natural killer cells therefore, since massage decreases cortisol, your immune cells get a boost. Massage even seems to boost immunity in those people with severely compromised immune systems, such as breast-cancer patients.

Blues, be gone

Less cortisol and more serotonin and dopamine in your system may also mean less stress, anxiety, and depression. The right side of the frontal lobe of the brain is more active when we’re sad, and the left side is activated when we’re happy.

Studies have observed that massage decreases activity in the right lobe and increases functioning in the left. The well-being people feel after a massage is a big reason why some hospitals offer it to anxious patients pre­paring for surgery and cancer patients going through chemo.

PMS

A study involving women with severe PMS found that massage reduced symp­toms such as pain, water retention, and mood swings.

Cordi’s Tips on how to give the Perfect Massage

Set the Mood

The first step to a truly relaxing and sensual massage is setting the mood. Unplug the phone, turn off the tv and the computer. Light some candles, burn some incense and play some relaxing, sensual music. My personal favorite is “Air on the G String” by Bach.

Make sure the room is warm and your partner is completely naked. You want your lover to chill out, not freeze.

Accessories

Set up a massage workspace by covering your mattress with towels — so the massage oil doesn’t ruin your sheets.

Massage oil is the only required accessory. You can use scented or unscented, or even baby oil in a pinch. Rub your hands together to warm them and the oil up before touching your partner’s bare skin.

To easily make your own massage oil, just add between 10-20 drops of your favorite essential oil to about a cup of olive oil.

TIP: If you plan to get busy with a condom later, buy a water-based massage liquid — oil can destroy latex.

The Basics

The most sensitive body parts are: head and neck, ears, sides of the body from armpits to hips, inner thighs, fingers and toes, and, of course, genitals. Keep this handy list in mind as you provide some sensual R&R.

Here’s the rub

Practice these basic massage strokes on your partner and ask for feedback on which he enjoys most.

  • Slide: Lightly slide your hands up and down your partner’s body using your entire hand surface. This stroke is great for the arms, legs, back, and chest.
  • Palm circling: Move your hands in circles on your partner’s fleshy parts. Be careful not to massage bones directly — it doesn’t feel very good.
  • Knead: Grasp your honey’s flesh as if you were kneading bread dough. Use on the stomach, legs, tush, arms, hands, and feet.
  • Roll: Roll the flesh of your sweetie’s arms and legs between your hands as if you were rolling clay.
  • Tapping or hacking: Using your fingertips or the sides of your hands, make tapping or hacking motions. This is great for the back.
  • Thumb strokes: Using your thumbs, massage in a circular motion. Work upward and away from the spine when focusing on the back and shoulders.
  • Fingertip and fingernail circling: Use your fingertips or nails to draw circular shapes all over your partner’s skin.
  • Hair sweep: If you have long hair, sweep it across your partner’s body.
  • Sweep down: when doing any move in a massage, it is important to remember to always start and finish with a sweep down. Apply light pressure to the area and move your hands down away from the body part being massaged. This is ancient technique and believed to push the bad energy out of the body and into the ground, instead of spreading it through the body.

Now give the perfect massage

1. Laying on of hands. With your guy lying on his stomach, buck-naked, warm your hands by rubbing them together and place them on your partner — one hand on the upper back, one hand on the lower. Leave your hands there for a long moment; this starts your lover on the path to relaxation.

2. Spread the oil. Make sure you’ve warmed it in your hands first, and start with a very small amount.

3. Start rubbing. Rub your hands up and down your sweetie’s whole backside. Accentuate the different strokes described above that your lover enjoys the most, until you feel relaxation set in. The back and the tush are excellent places to use the tapping/hacking technique. These are both excellent for breaking up stress.

4. Legs. Continue onto the legs. Be sure to cover both front and back sides with sensual strokes. I recommend using a kneading motion on the inner thighs, the thumb motion on the back of the knees and then knead again on the calves.

5. Arms and hands. Pay special attention to the hands. Use your thumbs to massage the heels of your lover’s hands. Lock your fingers with his and rotate his wrists gently.

6. Feet. There’s a whole school of massage — reflexology — devoted solely to the feet. Taking care of the feet is very important and one of the area’s that I always try to focus special attention on. Be sure to massage each toe and the area between them. Massage the top, sides, backs and the bottom of the feet. Our feet carry the weight of our bodies, so treat them right. It isn’t uncommon for me to spend 15 minutes on each foot.

7. Front torso. Take care massaging the abdomen. Press deeply, but not so much that it hurts. Ask if what you’re doing feels good. The abdomen and the chest are the perfect places to use the hair sweep if you have long hair.

8. Chest. Knead the fleshy parts, and use your fingertips to massage the nipples. Imagine that your fingers are following the spokes on a bicycle wheel, and let them radiate from the center of the nipple to its edge. Remember to use a light touch!

9. Neck and head. Anyone who’s gotten a scalp massage knows how it makes you tingle all over. Use your fingertips and nails to really dig in there…gently! Use fingers to run through the hair, with fingertips lightly gliding across the scalp.

10. Ears and Temples. Using thumb strokes, apply gentle pressure behind the ears and then gently massage the ear lobes with your thumb and forefinger. Run your fingers slowly up the side of the head in a circular motion to reach the temples and lightly massage with your thumbs in clockwise motion.

10. Genitals. If you’re going erotic, go all the way. Chances are you’ll get a thankful response no matter what you do.

Posted by Cordi on October 29th, 2009 No Comments

Cordi’s Feed and Seed – Allergies

What is an allergy?
Allergy is a catch-all word for a wide variety of reactions to substances that the body determines to be foreign. Anything that it does not recognize as itself can be considered an allergen. When the body encounters a foreign substance, it reacts by making antibodies or releasing certain chemicals called histamines. When histamines and other substances are released into the system, they cause an inflammatory reaction we call an allergy.

Allergies are greatly misunderstood and inadequately treated by conventional medicine. An allergy is the result of your immune system’s over-reaction to pollens, grass, airborne fungi and even certain foods and cosmetics. With more than 60,000 chemicals already existing in our environment, and nearly 500 new ones being created annually, we also face biochemical challenges to our immune system. When an allergen is introduced, the body fights back by producing an excess of inflammatory chemicals, such as histamine, from mast cells. This attempt to seek-and-destroy the allergen brings on the familiar symptoms of runny nose, watery eyes, sore throat and sneezing.

Given their generic name, antihistamines must prevent the production of histamine, right? No, they do not. Antihistamines merely block the action of histamine at receptor sites. In other words, they suppress the appearance of physical symptoms but do nothing to redirect the underlying cause.  Antihistamines also often produce undesirable side effects, such as dizziness, drowsiness and even depression.

One of the mechanisms involved in an allergic response is the release of leukotrienes, an agent which can restrict bronchial tubes up to 1,000 times greater than can histamine. The production of leukotrienes is made possible by the presence of arachidonic acid, a fatty acid found exclusively in animal products. Therefore, during serious bouts with allergies, you may want to consume an all vegan diet, or at least consider reducing your consumption of meat and dairy products, until your body has conquered its battle with the allergy.

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The inflammatory reaction affects the tissue and organs, mainly the skin, mucous membranes, lungs and gastrointestinal tract.

Symptoms commonly produced include: itching and watery eyes, runny and congested nose and sinuses, sneezing, respiratory symptoms, headache, skin reactions and rapid heart beat. Other symptoms may include fatigue, intestinal gas or pain, abdominal bloating and mood changes.

Will Acupressure Relieve Sinus Symptoms?

Above the nose and between the eyes at the brow, on either side of the nose at the corners of the eyes, and to the side of each nostril there are acupressure points that affect the sinuses.

There are also sinus acupressure point on the back of the hand in the “web” and similar points in the hollow between the front and back muscles of the neck (roughly behind the bony area behind each ear).

Many allergy sufferers report that steady pressure with the index fingers on these points, starting at the nostrils, moving to the corners of the eyes, then to the hand, the back of the neck, and <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} p {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-margin-top-alt:auto; margin-right:0in; mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} p.western, li.western, div.western {mso-style-name:western; mso-style-unhide:no; mso-margin-top-alt:auto; margin-right:0in; mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –> ending with the area between the eyes, yields significant relief. About 30 seconds of pressure at each point, sometimes with a small circular motion, will suffice. This method can be repeated as often as needed.

If you are familiar with palm reading the best way to find your acupressure spot is to locate lower mars (which also coincides with the line on your palm that represents the head) and flip your hand over. The front side of these points is perfect for acupressure involving sinus relief. This area is also called “Joining of the Valleys”

Horseradish Root – acts as an antibiotic, antiseptic and works as a nasal and bronchial dialator and local irritant. Helps cleanse the sinuses. Makes it easier for you to breathe!

Nettle – a nutritive, alternative tonic. Antihistamine and anti-inflammatory; moderates allergic response and reactions. Astringent to mucous membranes. Use for chronic inflammations and excessive mucous discharge. Used to treat hay fever in particular, stinging nettle relieves itchy eyes and sneezing.

Stinging nettles are great herbs for allergies because they have natural antihistamine properties. They lower the body’s ability to produce histamine, which causes symptoms like runny or stuffy noses, watery eyes, and irritated airways. The next time you shop for antihistamines, get nettles instead. They are available in capsules at most health food stores.

You can take herb capsules, use stinging nettle cream, or add the tincture to beverages. Stinging nettle is commonly added to green tea for allergy relief.

Yarrow Flower – astringent and hemostatic; vascular tonic. Diaphoretic and antifever.

Try the Aloe Vera (Aloeride) plant. Analgesics are found in the yellow sap of Aloe Vera. This natural herb helps reduce swelling, pain, and irritation. Ingredients like camestrol, B-sitosterol, and lupeol especially offer allergy relief. Aloe Vera can be used to treat allergy rashes when applied topically.

Reishi Mushroom

Fungi are considered natural herbs, even though they are technically fungi and not plants. But why quibble? Reishi mushrooms are classified as natural herbs for allergies. Reishi mushrooms can be found through herbalists, health food stores and stores catering to Chinese traditional medicine. They’re quite tasty, like shiitake mushrooms, but to get the most benefit from them, you have to take capsules instead of eating a whole bowlful of Reishi Mushrooms. The mushroom acts as a natural antihistamine. It is also used to lower cholesterol and thin the blood.

Chamomile- This herb can offer natural allergy relief by preventing asthma attacks. It can reduce inflammation of the lungs, thereby relieving chest tightness and making breathing much easier. Other herbs that you can drink as tea to counter an attack are peppermint, ginger, anise, motherwort, passionflower, and lemon verbena.


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Plantain—It has long been used as an herb against respiratory troubles. It gives natural allergy relief for people with allergic symptoms such as coughing and wheezing.

Eyebright – acts as an anti-inflammatory and antihistamine to mucous membranes of the eyes, ears, nose, sinuses, throat and bronchi. Use for Coughs, hoarseness, headache, conjunctivitis (pink eye), earache and sinusitis.

Angelica comes to the rescue for hay fever as well as other allergic reactions. It contains compounds that block the body’s production of certain antibodies that are made as the result of an allergic response. Use about 1/2 teaspoon per cup of water for tea.

  • HONEY—1 – 2 teaspoon of local honey taken every day will greatly help to build up your immune system and therefore help to reduce the allergic reactions that you suffer from the various triggers. If you are already suffering from an allergy attack, take 1-2 TB every day until the symptoms lessen and then begin taking the 1-2 TSP daily.
  • The honey must be local honey not the fake store bought kind. You can usually find it at your herbal or natural stores. Check out my show notes from a few weeks ago when I discussed the amazing healing properties of honey and some of its uses.

  • Make an eyewash from goldenseal or eyebright teas. Once the tea has cooled, put in a dropper bottle and apply to irritated eyes.

  • Take parsley and bee pollen.

  • Take the herbs comfrey and juniper in capsule form.

  • Take pantothenic acid, vitamin C, and dolomite supplements.

Steam. Breathing steam refreshes and soothes irritated sinuses, and it helps rid the nasal passages of mucus. While it takes some time, it will make you feel wonderful! Boil several cups of water and pour into a big bowl (or a plugged sink). Lean carefully over the bowl, and drape a towel over your head. Breathe gently for 5 to 10 minutes. If you have any fresh or dried peppermint add that to the boiling water. If you have any peppermint oil..add 3-5 drops into the water and then inhale the steam.

When you’re finished breathing steam, use the water for a second purpose: Let the water cool until warm, saturate a washcloth, and hold the cloth on your sinuses (to the sides of your nose, below the eyes, and above the eyebrows).

Basil. To help ease allergy symptoms such as hives, try dousing the skin with basil tea, a traditional Chinese folk remedy. Basil contains high amounts of an anti-allergic compound called caffeic acid. Place 1 ounce dried basil leaves into 1 quart boiling water. Cover, and let cool to room temperature. Use the tea as a rinse as often as needed.

Home Remedies From the Cupboard

Baking soda. One-half cup baking soda poured into a warm bath is an old New England folk remedy for soothing hives (red, itchy, raised areas on the skin). Soak in the bath for 20 to 30 minutes.

Tea. Allergy sufferers throughout the centuries have turned to hot tea to provide relief for clogged-up noses and irritated mucous membranes, and one of the best for symptom relief is peppermint tea. Peppermint’s benefits extend well beyond its delicious smell; the essential oil acts <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} span.articlebody {mso-style-name:articlebody; mso-style-unhide:no;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:2058552837; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:602017542 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:.5in; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} –>
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as a decongestant, and substances in peppermint contain anti-inflammatory and mild antibacterial constituents.

To make peppermint tea: Place 1/2 ounce dried peppermint leaves in a 1-quart jar. Fill two-thirds of the jar with boiling water, and steep for five minutes. (You can inhale the steam for added benefit). Let cool, strain, sweeten if desired, and drink. (Note: Peppermint tea should be used with caution in children, as the menthol in peppermint may cause them to choke.)

Home Remedies From the Freezer

Ice. Wrap a washcloth around ice cubes and apply it to your sinuses for instant relief and refreshment.

Home Remedies From the Refrigerator

Milk. Milk does the body good, especially when it comes to hives. Wet a cloth with cold milk and lay it on the affected area for 10 to 15 minutes.

Wasabi. If you’re a hay fever sufferer who also loves Japanese food, this remedy will please. Wasabi, that pale-green, fiery condiment served with many Japanese dishes, is a member of the horseradish family. Anyone who has taken too big a dollop of wasabi (or plain old horseradish) knows that it makes sinuses and tear ducts spring into action. That’s because allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent in wasabi, promotes mucus flow.

The tastiest way to get those allyl isothiocyanates is by slathering horseradish on your sandwich or plopping wasabi onto your favorite sushi. Another option — although harder to swallow — is to purchase grated horseradish, and take 1/4 teaspoon to alleviate allergy symptoms.

  • Avoid the culprit. Sometimes, the best way to reduce the discomfort of an allergy is to avoid exposure to the allergen as much as possible. If you are allergic to cats, for example, avoid visiting the homes of friends who own them. If you must be around a cat, make the visit as short as possible, avoid touching or picking up the animal, and wash your hands when you leave.
  • Rinse your eyes. If your eyes are itchy and irritated and you have no access to allergy medicine, rinsing your eyes with cool, clean water may help soothe them. Although not as effective as an antihistamine, this remedy certainly can’t do any harm.Try a warm washcloth. If sinus passages feel congested and painful, a washcloth soaked in warm water may make things flow a little easier. Place the washcloth over the nose and upper-cheek area and relax for a few minutes.

Use saline solution. Irrigating the nose with saline solution (salt water) may help soothe upper respiratory allergies by removing irritants that become lodged in the nose and cause inflammation. In fact, saline solution may even wash away some of the inflammatory cells themselves. You can buy ready-made saline solution at your local drugstore, or you can make your own fresh solution daily by mixing a teaspoon of salt in a pint of warm, distilled water and adding a pinch of baking soda. Bend over a sink and sniff a bit of solution into one nostril at a time, allowing it to drain back out through the nose or mouth; do this once or twice a day. (If you also have asthma, however, check with your doctor before trying this remedy.)

Wash your hair. If you’ve spent long hours outdoors during the pollen season, wash your hair to remove pollen after you come inside. The sticky yellow stuff tends to collect on the hair, making it more likely to fall into your eyes.

Take a shower. If you wake up in the middle of the night with a coughing, sneezing allergy attack, a hot shower may wash off any pollen residues you’ve collected on your <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} span.articlebody {mso-style-name:articlebody; mso-style-unhide:no;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:2058552837; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:602017542 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:.5in; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} –>
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  • body throughout the day. (You might want to change your pillowcase, too.) It may also help open up your sinuses, at least for a while, making breathing a little easier. The warm water may even help you relax and go back to sleep.Wear glasses. On a windy day in pollen season, a pair of sunglasses (or your regular prescription eyeglasses, if you wear them) may help shield your eyes from airborne allergens. For extra protection, try a pair of sunglasses with side shields or even a pair of goggles.

    Beware of the air. Breathing polluted air can worsen symptoms. In fact, airborne toxins can actually cause allergies in some people. If you suspect that air pollution triggers your attacks, spend as little time outdoors as possible on smoggy days. When you must go outside, wear a surgical mask, especially while exercising. Don’t expect miracles (the mask won’t screen out all allergens) but it may help you breathe a little easier.

    Make your house or apartment a no-smoking zone. Tobacco smoke is a notorious irritant, either causing or aggravating respiratory allergies. Don’t let your friends and family foul the air with cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. And, of course, if you still light up, stop it!

    Keep the windows shut.
    A fresh breeze blowing through an open window on a spring day may sound inviting, but its bad news for an allergy sufferer, since it can fill the house with pollen. To minimize contact with the powdery stuff, keep windows closed at all times. Air purifiers, especially those with HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters) filters, may help eliminate indoor pollen, but they also tend to stir up dust, which might worsen some allergies.

Go bare. Carpets are notorious for being a haven for dust mites (microscopic bugs that feed on the dead skin cells we constantly shed and whose droppings spur allergies in millions of people). Bare floors, vacuumed and damp-mopped frequently, will help keep your home’s dust-mite population down (you can’t get rid of them all). If you can’t remove all the carpeting in your home, at least opt for bare floors (if necessary, use small, frequently laundered throw rugs) in your bedroom; studies show the bedroom harbors more dust mites than any other room in the home, and you probably spend about a third of your time there every day.

Filter your vacuum.
When carpets can’t be removed, keeping them as clean as possible will help you breathe a bit easier. But beware: Many vacuums blast small particles of dust back into the air, leaving behind plenty of allergens to keep you sneezing and wheezing. Use a vacuum that has a built-in HEPA filter or attach a filter to the exhaust port of your canister vac (uprights usually don’t have an exhaust port). If dust really bothers you and you’ve got the money, consider investing in an industrial-strength vacuuming system. Some allergists recommend a brand called Nilfisk, which has an excellent filtering system and retails for about $500. To find out whether such products are appropriate for you and where you can purchase filters or special vacuums, talk to your allergist.

Dehumidify. Dust mites love a humid environment, which allows them to reproduce like crazy. Invest in a dehumidifier or use an air conditioner, which works equally well. A dehumidifier can also help prevent mold, another allergen, from growing (just be sure to follow the manufacturer’s maintenance instructions). When cooking or showering, take advantage of the exhaust fan, another way to help keep humidity to a minimum.

Think before you burn. Although in some areas it is common to burn household and construction refuse, this may not be such a wise idea. The smoke from burning wood that has been treated with heavy metals or other chemical-laden materials can make anyone gag, but people with allergies or asthma have ultrasensitive respiratory systems, making <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:Wingdings; panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0; mso-font-charset:2; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:0 268435456 0 0 -2147483648 0;} @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Georgia; panose-1:2 4 5 2 5 4 5 2 3 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:647 0 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} h3 {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-link:”Heading 3 Char”; mso-style-next:Normal; margin-top:12.0pt; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:3.0pt; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; page-break-after:avoid; mso-outline-level:3; font-size:13.0pt; font-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”; font-weight:bold;} p {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-margin-top-alt:auto; margin-right:0in; mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto; margin-left:0in; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;} span.Heading3Char {mso-style-name:”Heading 3 Char”; mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-locked:yes; mso-style-link:”Heading 3″; mso-ansi-font-size:13.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:13.0pt; font-family:”Arial”,”sans-serif”; mso-ascii-font-family:Arial; mso-hansi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; font-weight:bold;} span.articlebody {mso-style-name:articlebody; mso-style-unhide:no;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} /* List Definitions */ @list l0 {mso-list-id:2058552837; mso-list-type:hybrid; mso-list-template-ids:602017542 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693 67698689 67698691 67698693;} @list l0:level1 {mso-level-number-format:bullet; mso-level-text:; mso-level-tab-stop:.5in; mso-level-number-position:left; text-indent:-.25in; font-family:Symbol;} ol {margin-bottom:0in;} ul {margin-bottom:0in;} –>
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  • them even more vulnerable. Also, think twice about any material you burn in the fireplace. Of course, your best bet is to stay away from the fireplace altogether when it’s in use.

    Cut through the smoke.
    Many people with respiratory allergies find that wood smoke poses a particular problem. With wood stoves, the biggest problem is “choking down” the stove, or decreasing the amount of oxygen in order to cool down the fire. Choking down throws irritating toxins into the air, which you and your neighbors will breathe in.

  • Leave the mowing to someone else. During pollen season, a grass-allergic person is better off letting someone else, anyone else, mow the lawn. Call your local county extension service and find out when the pollination season occurs in your area, then arrange for a lawn-care company, friend, or relative to cut your grass during that time. (As a rule of thumb, in many parts of the country, people who are allergic to grass should avoid mowing between May and the Fourth of July.)Wash your pet.

    A little-known trick for dog or cat owners who are allergic to fur: Bathe your pet frequently. Fido and Fifi produce allergy-causing substances in their sweat and saliva that gets on their fur. Fortunately, these allergens dissolve in water, so a warm bath can rinse away the problem. If you’re a cat owner and can’t imagine bathing your beloved feline for fear of being scratched near to death, take heart: Some cats (though a minority, to be sure) purr when bathed. If you start bathing your feline regularly when it’s a kitten, chances are higher that clean-up time will be a harmonious experience. Wash your cat in warm water, with no soap, once every other week.

    In addition to bathing your pet, try to wash your hands soon after you’ve had direct contact with your furry friend.

    Make sure your final rinse really rinses.

    Chemicals in detergents and other laundry products can cause skin irritation in many people. That holds true even for detergents advertised as “mild.” Be sure that your washer removes all of the detergent from your clothes after the final rinse cycle. Try adding yet another rinse cycle to see if skin irritation decreases.

    Call ahead.
    When planning a vacation or business trip, call ahead to find a room that will be easier on your allergies. Ask for a room that’s not on the lower level, since it may have been flooded in the past and remain a haven for mold growth. Shop around for a hotel or motel that doesn’t allow pets, so you won’t be subject to the leftover dander of the last traveler’s dog or cat. If possible, bring your own vinyl- or plastic-encased pillow.

· Avoid food like tea/coffee or containing chemical additives and preservatives

Foods which should be excluded from the diet are tea, coffee, chocolate, cola drinks, alcohol, sugar and products made from it, refined cereals, meal, fish, chicken, tobacco, milk, cheese, butter, smoked and salted pickled foods, and foods containing any chemical additives, preservatives and flavorings.

Posted by Cordi on July 23rd, 2009 No Comments

Cordi’s Feed and Seed – How To – Edible Bikini’s and Panties

Animal Farm Exclusive!!! May 27, 2009

Edible Bikini’s or Panties

  • Blender or a food processor.

  • Baking sheets

  • Wax paper/saran wrap

  • Fruit

  • Sugar

  • Lemon Juice

  • Patterns

  • Scissors or sharp knife

  • Storage bag

  • Water

  • Many kinds of fresh fruit work well for leather; simply wash them, dry well, remove any blemishes, and peel if desired before pureeing (chunk larger fruits before pureeing to speed the process).

Some fruits need pre-treatment to prevent discoloration and flavor loss; these include apples, apricots, peaches, and pears. The easiest is a dip in lemon juice (other citrus juices will work too, if you’d like to experiment with flavor combinations). Don’t soak the fruit for a long period — 30-45 minutes is the absolute maximum I recommend. The longer they soak, the longer the drying time will be; a 5-minute dip is more than sufficient.

Frozen fruits also work well; in fact, freezing and thawing some fruits improves them for use in fruit leather. If a frozen fruit is especially juicy, you may wish to drain off some of the excess juice before proceeding — you can keep it in if you wish, but doing so will extend the drying time.

Fruit suggestions:

  • Apple — apple pie leather (using cinnamon and nutmeg); apple-maple; apple-pear. Extremely versatile, and blends well with other fruits. Pretreatment essential if you don’t want disgusting-colored leather. If you make your own applesauce, blend different varieties of apples for nice flavors, then make your leathers. Spices to consider: cardamom; cinnamon; cloves; nutmeg.

  • Banana — best used in blends with other fruit, especially berries or tart fruit. A bit of lemon juice will help stop discoloration. Strawberry-banana, raspberry-banana, orange-pineapple-banana (yummy with or without coconut) are some good combinations. Nutmeg’s a nice addition to some banana-blend leathers.

  • Blueberry — defrosted frozen berries work very well. Wonderful in many combinations — blueberry-lime is one. Cinnamon is an excellent spice to add to blueberry leathers.

  • Cantaloupe

  • Cherry

  • Peach — fresh is best (but that’s always the case with this wonderful fruit). Frozen fruit works very well, too. Peach-strawberry, peach-cherry! Add cinnamon or nutmeg (both if you wish), or cardamom.

  • Pumpkin — pumpkin pie leather! Or pumpkin-apple leather. Allspice, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg — pumpkin stands up well to assertive spicing (but remember, flavors will concentrate so don’t go overboard).

  • Raspberry — highly versatile gems, these are great alone or in combinations. Try them with cranberries, strawberries, blueberries, peaches, or apples — or be even more daring and blend three fruits. Orange juice is a nice liquid addition (which may be necessary if using fresh fruit; it’s unlikely you’ll need it with thawed frozen raspberries). For extra zing, add a touch of cinnamon.

  • Strawberry – another fruit workhorse. As with raspberries, thawed fruit have more juice than fresh. Try strawberry-rhubarb leather; or pair with banana, cranberry, blueberry, peach, or raspberry.

  • For more adult-flavored fruit leathers, small amounts of fruit brandy or liqueurs (or nut liqueurs) can be added to the puree. Or, for a more subtle adult kick, reduce a decent red wine and add it to raspberry, strawberry, cherry, or pear purees. (To reduce a wine, simply boil it down to a concentrated syrup, stirring occasionally.)

  • One can probably do the same thing with white wines — Chablis would be a nice addition to many fruit purees. (I don’t think most wines would combine well with acidic fruits, such as citrus and cranberry, as the flavors could compete.) Dry wines would probably work better with sweet fruits, and sweeter wines would complement more tart fruits.

  • Consider combining unflavored (or vanilla) yogurt with a fruit puree for an even more nutritious snack. This could take much longer to dry, depending upon how much yogurt you add. Storage is the same as for fruit leather.

FYI on some Fruits

  • Citrus fruits — These are too juicy and don’t have enough substance to work on their own, but the juice and/or pulp can be added to other fruits with delicious results. Cranberry and orange are a very nice combination; lemon gives a nice zing to many sweet fruits.

  • Coconut – not substantial enough on its own, but makes a good sweetener/bulking addition to other fruits. Or, sprinkle it on the top for a nice variation. If you’re working with fresh coconut, don’t forget to save and use the milk too!

  • Cranberry – Freezing them first softens them, and helps release the scant liquid they contain; even so, you’ll need to add additional liquid, and a hefty amount of sweetener to make cranberry leather palatable to most people. Or, they can be cooked (12 oz. berries, 1/2 C sugar, and 1/2 C fresh orange juice is a good jump-off recipe) until the berries all pop. More liquid may be required after cooking to get the proper consistency for making leather. They yield a quite lumpy leather unless you remove at least some of the seeds and skins. Applesauce is a natural, easy addition for a tasty blend that also provides the liquid cranberries need. Think of all the cranberry blend juice drinks available if you need further inspiration. Cinnamon, cloves, or allspice are yummy spices with cranberries.

How to Make Edible Underwear

Making your own edible underwear is a tasty way to add a little romance to your evening. It tastes better than the store-bought variety, and it won’t turn your teeth colors. You must prepare your edible underwear a day or two in advance so they’re ready for your romantic evening.

Make Fruit Leather

  • Core, peel and slice several pounds of red apples and place them in a large stock pot.

  • Add 1 cup water and 1 cup sugar to the pot. Cover and boil until it resembles apple sauce. (Or you can omit these steps and just start out with a jar of applesauce ). Brown sugar, honey, and maple syrup are other good sweeteners that add their own nice flavors — but do use genuine maple syrup, not the fake crap. Keep in mind that all flavors will concentrate as the fruit puree dries into leather, so use a light touch with all additional flavorings.

  • Reduce the heat and simmer another 45 minutes.

Spray your baking sheets with cooking spray and spread the fruit puree as evenly as possibly on the trays, to between 1/4 and 3/8 of an inch thick. Waxed paper won’t work to line your baking sheets with, so just put a very light coating of nonstick cooking spray on your sheets. Try to stay away from anything that is aluminum, because it is far too reactive for the leather

You can make your own non stick spray by just putting your olive or veggie oil into a spray bottle, adding just a dash of water to it. This will help the leather to release easily, w/o any tearing.

  • Place the baking sheets in a 140- to 150-degree oven (or as low as your oven will go). It takes 10 to 12 hours to dry the fruit leather for your edible underwear.

  • Drying times vary widely, depending upon the liquid content of the puree, the thickness of the puree on the trays, and temperature. Begin checking the leather after 2-3 hours.

When there are no tacky spots, the leather is dried. Remove from the tray while warm. You can gently lay them on waxed paper or plastic wrap now, after they are cool, fold them so they will fit in zip lock baggies if you want to store them for use at a different time.

Storage: at room temperature (in a dark place) — three weeks
Refrigerated — three months
Freezer — twelve months

If you’re ready to make your edibles: Lay out your fruit leather on plastic wrap or wax paper to prevent it from sticking to your countertops. Lay another piece of plastic wrap/wax paper over the top to keep it clean until your ready cut it. Think Fruit Roll-up!

Cut Your Pattern

  • Lay your underwear/bikini top pattern out over you apple leather and cut it out using the paper as a guide. I lay the pattern on top of the top sheet of wax paper and just cut through the wax paper as I go.

  • Cut your pattern out of the apple leather using the paper as a guide.

  • Line up your underwear pieces and use the pointed end of a chopstick to poke holes in both sides of the edible underwear.

  • Weave licorice through the holes in the edible underwear to “sew” it together.

You can find underwear patterns at your local fabric store.

Add 1/2 an inch to your underwear pattern as there isn’t a lot of stretch in apple leather.

Crafty Knitted Edible Undies

Like all fine lingerie, these panties are very delicate. Knit gently. If you need your L-string to last longer than a few hours before use, you will need to keep the panties moist.  This can be accomplished by wrapping the panties in plastic, or for extended storage needs, spraying with a vegetable oil spray and then wrapping.

MATERIALS

Licorice laces, how much you’ll need depends on your size.

1 set of chopsticks

GAUGE

7 sts = 5 inches and 7 rows = 4″ in stockinette stitch

DIRECTIONS

Using backwards loop method, CO 3 sts.
Beg with a RS row, work in St st for 4 rows.
CO 1 st at beg of next two rows. [5 sts]
Work even for 3 rows.
CO 1 st at beg of next 2 rows. [7 sts]
Work even for 3 rows.  Do not BO.

FINISHING

For back string, cut [or tie, as necessary] a strand to double the needed length to give your desired rise measurement.
Thread strand through center st at CO edge of panties and knot ends.  This gives you a double strand for the back string portion.
Cut [or tie] double strand to desired waist measurement plus 6-8 inches.  Slip sts onto double strand, and then thread double strand under knot in back string.
Tie to desired waist measurement.

Posted by ben on May 28th, 2009 No Comments

Cordi – How To – Blowguns

It is currently legal to own and use blowguns and darts in the USA.

Blow Gun Supplies

3 bic pens, a clicky pen (the kind where you can click the ink cartridge up and down), 2 marker caps (They have to stay the same size from one end to the other and have to have a snug fit on the bic pens), and some type of needle or pin.

Making the Dart

In the clicky pen there is a piece of plastic that looks like the back part of real darts. It is on the inside up at the top by the part you push down. There should be a hole on the smaller side and if not poke a hole in it or use a different pen. Take that piece and stick the needle or pin into it so it looks like a dart (if it is not a snug fit find a different needle/pin or melt the plastic around the needle/pin).

How to make the Gun

Take your 3 bic pens and hollow them out and cut off the back side so you can see right though it. Take your marker caps and hollow them out. Now connect the bic pens and the marker caps together.

Easy blowgun 2

Instructions

Things You Need:

  • Rigid hollow tube
  • File
  • Protective eye wear
  • Plastic film canister
  • Sharp knife
  • Gloves
  • Tape
  • Decorative materials
  • Leather or cloth

Find a rigid, hollow tube that is from 4 to 7 feet long and about a half inch in diameter. Copper tubing or galvanized conduit are good, cheap choices, as is bamboo, river cane, dried and treated sunflower stalks, etc. Get creative.

File any burrs out of the cut ends of the tubing.

Cut the end out of a plastic film canister carefully, using a sharp knife to make a mouthpiece for your gun. If your blowgun is smaller in diameter than the tubing, use marker caps, etc as your mouthpiece.

Wrap duct tape or electrical tape around one end of the gun barrel tube to a thickness that is a little more than the circumference of the film canister.

Push the film canister onto the taped end of the tube until it seals tightly and still protrudes from the end of the tube. Wrap duct or electrical tape around the outside of the film canister, securing and sealing it to the end of the tube.

Decorate your blowgun by wrapping it with colored yarns, tapes or coloring designs on it with permanent marker. Hang feathers from leather thongs for cheap decoration.

Make a carrier for your blowgun from leather or cloth.

Homemade blowgun darts

Dart 1 is the small blowgun dart, like you would use for the blowgun made out of pens. It is very easy and simple to make and you can make a whole bunch of them in a short amount of time.

· Start out with a simple sewing needle, choose some thread and thread the needle, leaving about one inch of thread coming out of the needle’s eye on each side.

· Then tie a knot in the thread so it is secure to the needle. Repeat this process up to 15 times or as many as you can get through the needle eye.

· You will now have 30 one-inch threads tied to the needle. Now take the eraser off of the end of a pencil so that you have a perfect small cylinder to use as the base of the dart. Push the needle through the center of the top of the eraser so that the point comes out of the bottom. Stop pushing once the end with the thread attached to the needle is just underneath the surface of the top of the eraser. You now have a homemade dart used for a blowgun, which can be made by rolling up a piece of heavy paper into a tube. You can also throw the darts but they will not go too far without a blowgun to shoot through.

Dart 2- Make a normal sized dart that you can use on a dartboard or the traditional Cherokee blowgun that was discussed on my show.

  • Take a new pencil and cut off the end of it right at the base of the eraser. All you are left with is a straight pencil with no metal or eraser attached to it.

· Now take a knife or saw and put four notches about 1/4 inch deep into the end of the pencil in the shape of a cross. The end of the pencil should kind of look like a Phillips head screwdriver could fit into it. Be extremely careful and take your time because it is very easy to split the pencil in half, and if you do that you will have to start over.

· Now take a piece of cardboard and cut out four small diamond-shaped pieces about 1 inch each in diameter. Use the glue and apply plenty of it inside the four notches on the end of the pencil.

· Place one cardboard diamond inside each heavily glued notch so that you have four guiding fins on the end of the pencil. After the glue dries, simply sharpen the other end of the pencil. You will be amazed at how well this type of dart works.

Dart 3- The last kind of homemade dart, and the most dangerous, is the lawn dart.

There are many different ways to make a lawn dart but this lawn dart is made with a small potato.

· Take a penny-sized nail and tie five or more pieces of twine about six or seven inches in length around the base of the nail so that you have at least 10 pieces of twine hanging off the back of the nail. Next simply drive the penny nail through a potato long ways until about two inches of the nail is sticking out of the other end of the potato.

· The twine pieces should be sticking out of one end of the potato and the nail point should be sticking out the other end. The potato lawn dart is a funny looking, but it works.

It is easy to be deceived by plants, one part may be edible while another is poisonous. The following chart lists some of the more common poisonous plants.

The most widely known example is Digitalis: small doses are good for many heart conditions, while a larger dose will stop the heart. And so, the opposite is true that large doses of innocuous herbs can do a great deal of damage. Anything taken regularly over a long period of time is stored in the body and could create a condition of toxicity.

To make the ‘salve’ for the darts.

· Place your plant matter in a pot, add enough water to cover the plants. Boil it for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and cover. Allow it to steep for about 4 hours. The longer it steeps, the more potent it will be.

· ****Remember not to stand directly over it as it is steaming. You don’t want to inhale the steam!

· When the ‘tea’ has steeped the appropriate amount of time, strain it and discard of the toxic plants somewhere safe.

· To make the dart salve you will need a base, something like paraffin wax, beeswax, lard, petroleum jelly, etc.

· Take one cup of the base matter and slowly add some of the dart tea to it, stirring it well.

· You have to play around with the amounts of base and tea, to get it just right. But your finished product should be like glue.

· Be sure to wear gloves when doing this, just to be safe.

· When the glue like consistency is reached, using a paint brush, paint the tips and sides of your darts with the dart toxin. I usually use beeswax as my base. Allow the darts to dry completely. Store in a safe place.

· To use, wave the dart above a flame, just close and long enough to warm up the beeswax and shoot through your blowgun. Remember the old movies where they would show the Indians waving their arrows over the fire before they would shoot them? And how many of those arrows never caught fire, but the Indians fired them off anyways? Well, those weren’t fire darts/arrows, those were poison tipped ones. Just a bit of American History for y’all J

PLANT

TOXIC PART

SYMPTOMS

HOUSE PLANTS

Hyacinth, Narcissus, Daffodil

Bulbs

Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. May be fatal.

Oleander

Leaves, branches

Extremely poisonous. Affects the heart, produces severe digestive upset and has caused death.

Dieffenbachia (Dumb Cane), Elephant Ear

All parts

Intense burning and irritation of the mouth and tongue. Death can occur if base of the tongue swells enough to block the air passage of the throat.

Rosary Pea, Castor Bean

Seeds

Fatal. A single Rosary Pea seed has caused death. One or two Castor Bean seeds are near the lethal dose for adults.

FLOWER GARDEN PLANTS

Larkspur

Young plant, seeds

Digestive upset, nervous excitement, depression. May be fatal.

Monkshood

Fleshy roots

Digestive upset and nervous excitement.

Autumn Crocus, Star of Bethlehem

Bulbs

Vomiting and nervous excitement.

Lily-of-the-Valley

Leaves, flowers

Irregular heart beat and pulse, usually accompanied by digestive upset and mental confusion.

Iris

Underground stems

Severe-but not usually serious-digestive upset.

Foxglove

Leaves

Large amounts cause dangerously irregular heartbeat and pulse, usually digestive upset and mental confusion. May be fatal.

Bleeding Heart

Foliage, roots

May be poisonous in large amounts. Has proved fatal to cattle.

VEGETABLE GARDEN PLANTS

Rhubarb

Leaf blade

Fatal. Large amounts of raw or cooked leaves can cause convulsions, coma, followed rapidly by death.

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS

Daphne

Berries

Fatal. A few berries can kill a child.

Wisteria

Seeds, pods

Mild to severe digestive upset. Many children are poisoned by this plant.

Golden Chain

Bean-like capsules in which the seeds are suspended

Severe poisoning. Excitement, staggering, convulsions and coma. May be fatal.

Laurels, Rhododendrons, Azaleas

All parts

Fatal. Produces nausea and vomiting, depression, difficult breathing, prostration and coma.

Jasmine

Berries

Fatal. Digestive disturbance and nervous symptoms.

Lantana Camara (Red Sage)

Green berries

Fatal. Affects lungs, kidneys, heart and nervous system. Grows in the southern U.S. And in moderate climates.

Yew

Berries, foliage

Fatal. Foliage more toxic than berries. Death is usually sudden without warning symptoms.

TREES AND SHRUBS

Wild and cultivated cherries

Twigs, foliage

Fatal. Contains a compound that releases cyanide when eaten. Gasping, excitement and prostration are common symptoms.

Oaks

Foliage, acorns

Affects kidneys gradually. Symptoms appear only after several days or weeks. Takes a large amount for poisoning.

Elderberry

All parts, especially roots

Children have been poisoned by using pieces of the pithy stems for blowguns. Nausea and digestive upset.

Black Locust

Bark, sprouts, foliage

Children have suffered nausea, weakness and depression after chewing the bark and seeds.

PLANTS IN WOODED AREAS

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

All parts, especially roots

Like Dumb Cane, contains small needle-like crystals of calcium oxalate that cause intense irritation and burning of the mouth and tongue.

Moonseed

Berries

Blue, purple color, resembling wild grapes. May be fatal.

Mayapple

Apple, foliage, roots

Contains at least 16 active toxic principles, primarily in the roots. Children often eat the apple with no ill effects, but several apples may cause diarrhea.

Mistletoe

Berries

Fatal. Both children and adults have died from eating the berries.

PLANTS IN SWAMP OR MOIST AREAS

Water Hemlock

All parts

Fatal. Violent and painful convulsions. A number of people have died from hemlock.

PLANTS IN FIELDS

Buttercups

All parts

Irritant juices may severely injure the digestive system.

Nightshade

All parts, especially the unripened berry

Fatal. Intense digestive disturbance and nervous symptoms.

Poison Hemlock

All parts

Fatal. Resembles a large wild carrot.

Jimson Weed (Thorn Apple)

All parts

Abnormal thirst, distorted sight, delirium, incoherence and coma. Common cause of poisoning. Has proved fatal.

***this is for informational purposes only. Use at your own risk. Neither Cordi Howell, Cordite Country, Oracle Broadcasting, the Animal Farm or any of their associates and/or affiliates is responsible for YOUR actions.

Posted by ben on May 18th, 2009 No Comments

Cordi’s Edible Lotion and Massage Oil Recipes

Cordi’s Edible Lotion and Massage Oil Recipes

The Health Facts about Commercial Lotion and Oils

Exposure to personal care product chemicals comes from dermal absorption and inhalation and many of these chemicals remain in the body for life.

  • A consumer survey of over 2,300 people conducted in 2004 on the use of personal care products found the average adult uses 9 personal care products daily, exposing them to 126 unique chemicals everyday.
  • One in 13 women and one in 23 men are exposed daily to ingredients that are known or probable human carcinogens and one in 24 women are exposed daily to ingredients that are known or probable reproductive and developmental toxins.

· 89% of the 10,500 ingredients used in personal care products have not been evaluated for safety by the FDA or other publicly accountable institution.

· In the last 30 years, only 9 of the 10,500 ingredients commonly used in commercial skin care products have been banned or restricted.

· 99% of all personal care products have one or more ingredients that have not been publicly assessed for safety by the cosmetic industry or the FDA.

· In 2005, the FDA indicated that they do not ensure the safety of personal care products before they are sold nor do they require pre-market safety testing of the product’s ingredients.  The FDA states that they do not have guidelines and safety standards for the personal care industry and leaves it to product manufacturers to determine what is safe enough for consumer use.

· 1 in 100 personal care products contain ingredients classified by the US government as known human carcinogens and 1/3 of all products have one or more ingredients classified as “possible” human carcinogens.

Read the Labels

Many personal care companies claim to be “Natural” or use “Organic” ingredients. Most often these companies use a few healthy ingredients mixed in with synthetic chemical and petroleum based colors, fragrances and preservatives so they can call their product natural based. If you want to know if the products you are using are safe and truly “natural”, read the ingredients. Personal care products can be made without the use of synthetic and petroleum based ingredients.

Two common classes of synthetic petrochemicals found in many “natural” and “Organic” products.

· Petroleum Based Preservatives – most commonly found in the form of “parabens” such as methyl paraben, propylparaben and butylparaben, exist in many “natural” and “organic” personal care products. These synthetic chemicals are used as preservatives and pose health risks such as increased breast cancer risks, potential endocrine disruptor that can impair fertility or development and skin sensitizer to cause burning, itching, scaling and blistering of the skin.

· Petroleum Surfactants – used as foaming or wetting agents to create lather and most commonly found as sodium lauryl sulfate and propylene glycol. Another common petroleum surfactant is cocamidopropyl betaine, which many companies indicate as derived by coconut oil, but uses petrochemicals to manufacture. Health risks include skin sensitizer to cause burning, itching, scaling and blistering of the skin, penetration enhancer to alter the skin structure allowing chemicals to penetrate deeper into the skin potentially increasing the amounts of other chemicals reaching the bloodstream and may have harmful impurities or breakdown to form toxic chemicals linked to cancer.

Incredible Edible Massage Oil

This product is sweetened with all natural vegetable glycerin. Do not use if you are diabetic.

16 oz. food grade vegetable or nut oil of your choice (try to stick to the lighter oils, such as sweet almond, sunflower or jojoba.)

vegetable glycerin, (sample it by applying a small amount to your hand). The glycerin will also add a “heating” effect, when rubbed into the skin.

A few drops of your favorite flavor oil: mint, lemon, vanilla, orange, rum, etc.

Combine everything in a glass jar/bottle. Cap and shake.

About Vegetable Glycerin:

Vegetable Glycerin is a clear, colorless, and odorless liquid with an incredibly sweet taste having the consistency of thick syrup. Its solvency action aids herbalists in extracting botanical properties from plant materials without the use of alcohol. This is especially helpful for those with alcohol sensitivities as most liquid herbal extracts contain alcohol. But given its severely limited shelf life, extracts made from Vegetable Glycerin typically have a shelf life of 14-24 months whereas alcohol extracts can have an extended shelf life of 4-6 years.

Also known as glycerol, glycerin is found widely in the body where it serves as the backbone for a triglyceride or found floating freely in the body.

A triglyceride is a type of fat that travels through the body to be used for energy or stored as fat. As the triglyceride is broken down for energy, the byproducts are glycerol and three individual fatty acids. The glycerol component is a fat but, unlike any other fat, can be converted to glucose and used for immediate energy. The three fatty acids which were part of the triglyceride chain can be used for energy or stored as fat for future use.

When combined with water, glycerin works like humectants, which act to keep things moist. Without the addition of water, glycerin will pull water from the skin and cause dry skin. Although it is not a sugar or a carbohydrate, glycerin makes things taste sweet. It is the only fat that can be converted to glucose for energy. Health-conscious people use glycerin as an alternative sweetener because it is converted to glucose at such a slow rate that it is unlikely to cause the rapid rise in insulin associated with weight gain.

Whether you use glycerin in a recipe for food or as a lubricant, it gives you energy and the lubricating properties of oil without the stored calories associated with oils.

What you mix with glycerin will determine its taste because you choose the flavor enhancer.

Tingly Mint Body Lotion Recipe

1/2-cup warm mint water
1/8 tsp. vegetable glycerin
1/2 c. sunflower oil
1 tsp. coconut oil
1 tsp. beeswax
3-4 drops peppermint oil

Mint water is made by boiling fresh or dried mint leaves in water and then letting the mixture cool to a lukewarm temperature. Strain off the mint leaves. I use 1-cup fresh mint (1/4 cup dried mint leaves) to 1-cup water

· Mix together the mint water and the glycerin, stirring until well mixed. Set aside.

· Mix together the sunflower oil, coconut oil, and beeswax in a glass measuring cup. Place the cup with the oils–beeswax mixture in a pan of water (about 1 to 2 inches of water), making a water bath. Heat over medium heat until the beeswax is melted (8 to 10 minutes), stirring occasionally.

· When the wax is melted, bring the mint solution almost to boiling (put the glass cup with the mint water/glycerin in a warm water bath on the stove top).

· Remove the oils-beeswax mixture from the water bath. Slowly add mint & glycerin mixture to the oils-beeswax mixture in the blender and whip.

· Allow the lotion to cool completely. The consistency may seem a bit thin, but it will thicken as it cools. The lotion will be pale green in color. You may add the peppermint oil now if you wish.

· Pour the lotion into a clean container with a lid. To use, massage a small amount into your skin.

Makes a 1/2 cup or 4 oz.

Whipped Body Cream

  • 2 Tb. Beeswax
  • 1 Tb. Jojoba oil
  • 1 Tb. Mango butter
  • 1 Tb. Cocoa butter
  • 1 Tb. Coconut oil
  • 1 Tb. Your favorite flavored extract
  • 5 Tb. Aloe Vera GelMelt butters and wax, stir in oils. When cooled, beat in 5 T. aloe gel until fluffy.

Edible Chocolate Lotion Recipe

  • 6 oz. fine-quality bittersweet chocolate (not unsweetened); chopped well. (set aside in a bowl)
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

Directions

  1. In a small saucepan, bring the cream and sugar just to a simmer, stirring until sugar is dissolved, and pour over chocolate.
  2. Stir until smooth. (Make sure temperature is warm when applying to body)
  3. Leftovers may be stored in fridge up to one week.
  4. This lotion gets that ‘magic shell’ texture to it as it cools. Use your imagination when applying to the body.

Edible Chocolate Sauce Body Lotion

This chocolate sauce is edible! And it warms up when blown on.

2 tbsp glycerin
1 tbsp cocoa powder
1 tbsp cocoa butter

Melt cocoa butter. Add glycerin and cocoa powder, stirring well until combined. Use for body lotion, and it is edible. Don’t forget the chocolate may stain sheets and clothing!



Posted by ben on April 22nd, 2009 No Comments

Cordi’s Mead – Recipe

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Mead is an alcoholic beverage produced by the fermentation of a diluted mixture of honey and water.

Serving Size: 1 Large Glass (8.1 oz) approx. 350 calories; 0 fat grams; 40 g Carbs; Sugar 40 g.

It is typically clear with a slight gold tint, with an alcohol content of between 7-22%. By varying the proportions of honey and water and the point at which fermentation is stopped, a wide variety of types can be produced ranging from a very dry and light mead similar to more traditional white grape wines, to sweet and heavy-bodied desert wine. If fermentation is left to continue while bottled a sparkling mead resembling a sparkling white wine is produced.

  1. Mix 1 quart honey with 3 quarts distilled water simmer for 5 minutes (do not boil). If you wish to add herbs and spices, add them while it cooks — star anise and cinnamon work well
  2. Cool the mixture to just above body temperature.
  3. Add a package of yeast and mix it up. An easy way to promote growth of the yeast is to take a cup of the honey water mixture and introduce the yeast to it in a small container. This will give the yeast time to multiply and ensures a better start.
  4. Put in a large container (gallon wine jugs work well).
  5. The best method for allowing the gases to escape is a bubbler. This is a one way airlock that allows the CO2 to escape while keeping the air out. However, without a bubbler, a length of sterile rubber tubing can be stretched over the top and lead into a secondary container of water so that the air will bubble up through the water in the secondary container. This will prevent any air from re-entering your fermenting container. We just use a balloon.
  6. Put in a dark place and let sit for 7 days. Although it’s not necessary, secondary fermentation will greatly improve your mead.
  7. Do not refrigerate. Let your mead sit in the jar you brewed it in for another 3-4 months. Keep a tight seal on the bottle.
  8. Siphon the mead off into bottles, using a piece of food grade tubing. You should have several containers to siphon the mead to and from. This is called racking and will help to reduce the sediment (lees) left by the yeast. If you don’t have any tubing, just siphon it thru some cheesecloth or linen.
  9. Store in a cool dark place.
  10. Your mead is now drinkable, but it is even better when aged several months.

Posted by ben on April 17th, 2009 No Comments